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Dear Employers, Recruiters, and Human Resources Departments,

Are you looking to fill jobs before the new year? Your ideal candidate could be one of our readers! Get exposure to job seekers around the world by posting your jobs through us.

If you have a special position that you want to recruit you might want to try our Featured Job Promotional Package which includes blog posts and social media promotion on our Instagram and Twitter pages.

Also, if you’re a stellar company that cares about their employees, has incredible PTO, maybe a casual work environment, whatever it might be, we want to highlight you through our Company Profile Promotional Package

Also, are you a career coach, a resume writer or a freelancer who’s looking for clients to work with? The Cubicle Life offers the Career Services Promotional Package specifically for you!

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Dear Employers, Recruiters, and Human Resources Departments,

Did you know your ideal candidate could be a Cubicle Life reader? Get exposure to job seekers around the world by posting your jobs through us.

Post a job to our job board for 30 days for only $25 per job! This is cheaper than many other job boards. Or if you have a special position that you want to recruit you might want to try our Featured Job Promotional Package which includes blog posts and social media promotion on our Instagram and Twitter pages.

Also, if you’re a stellar company that cares about their employees, has incredible PTO, maybe a casual work environment, whatever it might be, we want to highlight you through our Company Profile Promotional Package

Also, are you a career coach, a resume writer or a freelancer who’s looking for clients to work with? The Cubicle Life offers the Career Services Promotional Package specifically for you!

All you have to do is visit our advertising page and let us promote you from there!

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Glassdoor: Why you should read all reviews before accepting that job

Job hunting can be exhausting! Whether you are looking for a job because you got laid off or you’re working at a job you hate and looking for a new one, it’s a full-time job looking for a job.

So when you get a call from a company wanting to interview you, or even better they want to hire you, you jump for joy! But hold up! Just because they want to bring you onboard doesn’t mean it’s the best company. Before you accept that offer or go too far in the interviewing process, I recommend checking out Glassdoor.

Glassdoor is a love-hate with most employers because current or ex-employees provide their thoughts on what it’s like to work for that company. Employees can be anonymous which can provide an opportunity for them to be unfiltered. Here’s why it’s important to read all reviews before accepting that job offer.

  • Reviews give you a peek inside the company: The great thing about Glassdoor is that they provide an insider’s perspective of the company. Reviewers provide the pros and the cons of working there and a star rating. In addition, to the reviews employees can state their salary and benefits. This is important because most of the time employers don’t mention the salary of the position until the end stages of the interview.
  • Watch out for too many good reviews: Employers know that candidates or potential candidates read Glassdoor so they might encourage employees to write good things about the company – especially if they have a ton of bad reviews. So watch out if you see a lot of five out of five-star reviews of people gloating about the company because they could be fake. One indication I’ve seen is the five-star reviews all tend to be written around the same time period. It could be within one month or all in one week.
  • Bad reviews can give you a warning: Bad reviews often serve as a warning for future employees about the harsh realities of the company. The company could have an amazing PTO, half-day Fridays, and smart and passionate employees. However, the cons could be that the company has a high turnover and is known for a bullying culture. Knowing this could have you dodge a bullet. I remember I looked on Glassdoor at a company that offered me the job and ignored the bad reviews and accepted the offer. Later I regretted this because I did end up seeing the cons of the company firsthand.
  • Read middle ground reviews: I like middle ground reviews (not the best, but not the worst) because they provide a great glimpse of what the company offers. These are most likely written by neutral employees or ex-employees who feel the company is great but also provides the truth of why it’s not perfect. They usually provide sound advice to management.

Employers, please take a look at your company on Glassdoor and instead of trying to paint your company as perfect with glowing reviews – make the necessary changes to improve employee morale. If there is a high turnover because of management – human resources should explore why that is happening. If there is a toxic bullying culture, this should be investigated because at the end of the day your employees are either your advocates or your worst enemy.

Job candidates, you might be desperate to make that move and accept their job offer, but it always helps to know what you’re getting yourself into before moving forward. This can be the difference of you enjoying your next job or looking for another one in three months.

Dear Employers: Why your company should invest in training (even if you don’t have time)

I will be doing an ongoing series called “Dear Employers,” a letter to companies, organizations, and businesses on how to implement better human resources onboarding, employee retention, and management. Hopefully, this will be an eye-opener for employers to know better and do better.

Dear Employers,

For employees to succeed in their job, they must be equipped for proper training. However, many employers don’t have the time to train. They are time and money strapped and most likely desire to hire someone with the skills they need so they can train as less as possible.

However, every company is different. Just because someone was a stellar employee at his or her last job doesn’t mean he or she will be successful at his or her new company. For this reason, it is why it’s imperative to provide training. And not just training on computer software and systems. There should be a training of the organization, protocols, how the employee’s job will play a role in the company and how it will interact with different people within the company.

Most companies will argue that this is a waste of time. However, if you have an employee that is fully engaged at the beginning of the process and continue to develop their professional skills, you’ll most likely have a high sense of retention and less turnover.

According to a CareerBuilder survey, one in four employers (25 percent) reported that their company’s onboarding process takes a day or less. Twenty-six percent spend a week, while 21 percent said the onboarding process takes place over the course of a month. One in 10 employers (11 percent) say their company extends this further and onboards employees over the course of three months or longer.

This statistic means that more than half of employers are not taking the proper amount of time to onboard their employees. Training should not take only a day or even a week. It honestly should take at least 1-3 months to be prepared to know and do your job
adequately.

Here are few ways of how to properly onboard employees and keep them engaged:

1. Employees should be slowly introduced to the job and then slowly pile responsibility on them: Put yourself in the new employee’s shoes. They don’t know everything. However, you expect to accumulate years of information into a day or two, and the employee is supposed to know the ins and outs of the organization and their part of the job. This is the reason why employees quit before six months is because they’re overwhelmed and don’t know how to catch up. The employee should slowly be introduced to his/her job responsibilities.

2. Team members should have patience with the new employee: When it comes to onboarding, everyone plays a part so everyone should not expect the new employee to know the insider lingo and remember every aspect of the job. He/She will have questions, and it’s up to current employees to be patient with the process of their learning.

3. Training shouldn’t stop with onboarding: Do you think your employee might know everything since they’ve been there for six months? A year? Five years? Wrong! Training should transform into professional development and how they can get better in their current positions or prepare them for promotion.

4. Make training engaging, but fun: Who says training has to be boring? Think of ways to keep it visual and engaging. Maybe it’s bringing in a guest speaker. Perhaps it’s creating a dazzling Powerpoint. Maybe it’s a team building experience. Whatever it is, make it engaging in a way where your employees are retaining the information and also enjoying the process.

Employers, it’s time to start reevaluating your methods. Whether you’re a small or large organization, training should be essential for every company. Are you training your employees? If so, how? How long is your onboarding process? Employees, did your employers do a proper job training you?

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Dear Employers, Recruiters, and Human Resources Departments,

Did you know your ideal candidate could be a Cubicle Life reader? Get exposure to job seekers around the world by posting your jobs through us.

Post a job to our job board for 30 days for only $25 per job! This is cheaper than many other job boards. Or if you have a special position that you want to recruit you might want to try our Featured Job Promotional Package which includes blog posts and social media promotion on our Instagram and Twitter pages.

Also, if you’re a stellar company that cares about their employees, has incredible PTO, maybe a casual work environment, whatever it might be, we want to highlight you through our Company Profile Promotional Package

Also, are you a career coach, a resume writer or a freelancer who’s looking for clients to work with? The Cubicle Life offers the Career Services Promotional Package specifically for you!

All you have to do is visit our advertising page and let us promote you from there!

Just fill out your info and we’ll handle it from there!

Working at a Small Organization vs. Large Organization

I’ve been fortunate enough to work in both small and large organizations. While both of them has its advantages, it also has its disadvantages. If you’re considering applying to either type of organization – consider all of these areas:

Benefits of working at a large organization

  • Structure: Larger organizations tend to be more organized than smaller organizations merely because they have more people. Most organizations have a plan when it comes to onboarding, performance and office policy. Some smaller organizations might not have this exact blueprint.
  • More technology: Large organizations have larger budgets to have advanced technology. This is extremely helpful when it comes to making your work easier and training.
  • You’ll become a specialist and not a generalist: At a large organization, you don’t have to worry about wearing many hats because most likely you’ll stick to the area of your job. Now and then you might be asked to help on additional projects outside your skill set, but it’ll be rare.
  • More opportunities to move around: If you’re bored with your position, don’t like your boss, want to pursue another area, want a promotion or want to move out of town, you could do so when you’re at a larger company. Large companies offer many positions and depending on the type of company they could provide you with a position in another city.
  • More benefits: Large companies sometimes offer perks – free gym membership, happy hour, discounts to retailers, raffle tickets, etc. Some even provide the option of working from home. A few companies offer a sabbatical for employees when they reach over 10 years of employment.

Disadvantages of working at a large organization

  • Don’t know all your coworkers: Some companies are so big and you won’t get to know all your colleagues or even meet them face-to-face. Sometimes you’ll be directed to someone who is not located in your city to work on a task.
  • Red tape: Bureaucratic tape tends to run deep at large companies. It can be difficult to do something simple when you have to go through five people to approve it. One time I wanted to run a social media ad for a conference I was promoting. Instead of creating the ad and paying for it I had to go through a ton of steps and approvals. I had to send the terms of agreement to the social media manager and outline all the social media ads I wanted to do over the course of the year. If it were approved I would have to contact purchasing – get a purchase order made by using a complicated outdated system and then the representative there would have to get my social media credentials to login and put in the payment information. So the red tape can be incredibly frustrating.
  • Ideas aren’t heard: You might have an idea of how to make a process smoother or an easier way to do something and you might tell your supervisor or even your boss’s boss. However, don’t expect your idea to get implemented or expedited. Large corporations are set in their ways, and most likely ideas and suggestions fall on deaf ears. And if they do consider your idea, it might take months or years to get it changed.
  • You’re just a number: Don’t expect senior managers to all know you by name because, at a large company, employees are just numbers. You might know your department, but you will never know everyone or even meet everyone. At some companies, I could count on my hand the times I’ve seen the CEO. I would be lucky if I saw them once.
  • Office politics: While office politics can happen in a smaller office, but it’s more of a jungle at a larger office. The larger the environment, the more competitive it is. You have to learn the organization, protocol and align with the right people to climb the ladder. And you have to use your insights and avoid divulging too much information because you never know when a backstabber might use it to their advantage.

Benefits of working at a small organization

  • Family like atmosphere: When you’re in a small office, most likely you will get to know your coworkers on a more personal level than if you were in a larger office. Because you’ll work so closely together you’ll most likely get to know their family and personal issues and you’ll create somewhat of a family-like bond. This is not to say everyone will like each other, but you’ll understand each other more.
  • No Red Tape: Do you need to get something done? No problem. Most likely all you have to do is ask your boss or another person. You don’t have to wait for approval from five people. Small companies are lean so approval for projects, programs, etc. usually comes down to one decision maker.
  • More access to decision makers: Because there’s no red tape, you’ll have access to decision makers right away. If you have an idea of how to make a process easier, you can pitch that idea to the right person, and it could become a reality.
  • Learn different aspects of the business: Even though you’ll have one job title, don’t expect your job responsibilities to only be your job. At a small company you’ll be a generalist – so you’ll learn every aspect of the business or at least exposed to it.
  • Create new positions: The beauty of working for a small office is growing with them as they grow into a bigger company. As they grow, they will need to create new positions, and since you’re already there, you’ll be the first they’ll consider.

Disadvantages of working at a small organization

  • Wearing many hats: While this might work for some people, for others it can be a challenge. You might have to do jobs that you don’t have the skill-set for, but because it’s a small organization, they expect all hands on deck.
  • Less training: Training might be condensed when it comes to a small organization. Most of your learning will come from on-the-job experience.
  • Less opportunity for promotion: If you’re looking to climb up the ladder, you have only two options – they’ll create a new position for you or someone will leave, and you can replace them. Opportunities for advancement are often limited.
  • Privacy is limited: NOTHING is private when it comes to a small office. If you have an issue with someone or a piece of gossip – good luck keeping it private because eventually, everyone will know.
  • Less technology: Because smaller organizations don’t have large budgets, their technology is not extremely advanced.

Please note that not all small and large organizations are the same as what I listed. I’ve worked at small companies that offered more work perks than larger ones. I’ve worked at large companies that had little to no room for advancement. However, at the end of the day, you want to find the perfect company size for you. Some people will thrive at a large company while others prefer to grow with a small company.

Do you work for a small or large organization? What would you say are some the advantages/disadvantages?